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But she doesn’t spare the alternative cultures either, cringing at all the woo-woo slang and corny neologisms she comes across, in scare quotes aplenty: Orgasmic Meditation’s use of “sex” as a verb and “tumesced” as an emotion, a shade of blush called “Super Orgasm,” and all manifestations of our millennium’s portmanteau mania—“coregasm,” “fungeon.” Whatever the future of sex may be, let’s hope it isn’t this cute.

You may have surmised that the book’s subjects are, as San Francisco has rapidly become, mostly white and well-off, enough that a more accurate title might be Privileged Sex (or perhaps, following the sex-book naming convention, Sex on the Coasts).

The honest depictions of her sexual experience make few concessions to dramatic tension, or even to sex.

Superficially, Future Sex resembles Robin Rinaldi’s The Wild Oats Project: A woman, uneasy about her age and romantic life, goes on a mission of carnal experimentation in San Francisco.

Witt includes her personal narrative not to curry readerly empathy (Will our intrepid, likable heroine find love and fulfillment?

The poorer fringes are mostly overlooked in her highly personal account, especially illegal sex work—the sugar babies of Seeking Arrangement, the hustling undergrads of Rentboy, Eros, and Backpage, and homeless survival workers, less visible but no less modern.

Perhaps out of a desire to report only on cultures she can directly experience, there’s a dearth of nonheterosexuality that’s glaring in light of her own declaration that she “wanted to live in a world with a wider range of sexual identities.”This cultural bubble—admittedly hard to avoid in the gentrified foam party of San Francisco—might be what leads Witt to occasionally overstate or over-generalize social progress, as when she claims that “open marriages had already lost stigma,” or that “we had expanded our idea of normal.” That may be true of media representation and marriage equality, but in its dissection of progressive mores, the book largely glosses over the concomitant backlash from the right: the

The honest depictions of her sexual experience make few concessions to dramatic tension, or even to sex.

Superficially, Future Sex resembles Robin Rinaldi’s The Wild Oats Project: A woman, uneasy about her age and romantic life, goes on a mission of carnal experimentation in San Francisco.

Witt includes her personal narrative not to curry readerly empathy (Will our intrepid, likable heroine find love and fulfillment?

The poorer fringes are mostly overlooked in her highly personal account, especially illegal sex work—the sugar babies of Seeking Arrangement, the hustling undergrads of Rentboy, Eros, and Backpage, and homeless survival workers, less visible but no less modern.

Perhaps out of a desire to report only on cultures she can directly experience, there’s a dearth of nonheterosexuality that’s glaring in light of her own declaration that she “wanted to live in a world with a wider range of sexual identities.”This cultural bubble—admittedly hard to avoid in the gentrified foam party of San Francisco—might be what leads Witt to occasionally overstate or over-generalize social progress, as when she claims that “open marriages had already lost stigma,” or that “we had expanded our idea of normal.” That may be true of media representation and marriage equality, but in its dissection of progressive mores, the book largely glosses over the concomitant backlash from the right: the $1.4 billion spent on abstinence-only education in Africa, or the ongoing push to defund Planned Parenthood and repeal Roe v. And as the chapter on birth control rightly points out, the development of other contraceptive technologies has stalled.

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The honest depictions of her sexual experience make few concessions to dramatic tension, or even to sex.Superficially, Future Sex resembles Robin Rinaldi’s The Wild Oats Project: A woman, uneasy about her age and romantic life, goes on a mission of carnal experimentation in San Francisco.Witt includes her personal narrative not to curry readerly empathy (Will our intrepid, likable heroine find love and fulfillment?The poorer fringes are mostly overlooked in her highly personal account, especially illegal sex work—the sugar babies of Seeking Arrangement, the hustling undergrads of Rentboy, Eros, and Backpage, and homeless survival workers, less visible but no less modern.Perhaps out of a desire to report only on cultures she can directly experience, there’s a dearth of nonheterosexuality that’s glaring in light of her own declaration that she “wanted to live in a world with a wider range of sexual identities.”This cultural bubble—admittedly hard to avoid in the gentrified foam party of San Francisco—might be what leads Witt to occasionally overstate or over-generalize social progress, as when she claims that “open marriages had already lost stigma,” or that “we had expanded our idea of normal.” That may be true of media representation and marriage equality, but in its dissection of progressive mores, the book largely glosses over the concomitant backlash from the right: the $1.4 billion spent on abstinence-only education in Africa, or the ongoing push to defund Planned Parenthood and repeal Roe v. And as the chapter on birth control rightly points out, the development of other contraceptive technologies has stalled.They believed in intentional communities that could successfully disrupt the monogamous heterosexual tradition.

.4 billion spent on abstinence-only education in Africa, or the ongoing push to defund Planned Parenthood and repeal Roe v. And as the chapter on birth control rightly points out, the development of other contraceptive technologies has stalled.